Michael D. Ramsey

              Professor of Law, University of San Diego Law School

University of San Diego Law School Courses

Spring 2017

Constitutional Law I (4 credits, required)

This course provides an introduction to the United States Constitution, stressing the theory and practice of judicial interpretation and review, the separation of federal powers, the relationship of the states to the federal government, and specific powers of the federal government. It also provides an introduction to the Bill of Rights and its limitations on the exercise of governmental power, with emphasis on freedom of speech.

International Business Transactions (3 credits, elective)

This course provides an introduction to the legal aspects of private international sales and investment transactions.  Topics include sales contracts, letters of credit, bills of lading, investment and financing contracts, and resolution of private sales and investment disputes. Regulatory aspects of international transactions, including export licensing, regulatory jurisdiction, and the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, will also be considered.  The focus will be transactional, with attention to the structure of private relationships and the anticipation and avoidance of litigation. 

Prerequisite: none, but prior or concurrent enrollment in Corporations is recommended.

Supreme Court Seminar (2 or 3 credits) (elective, writing credit available)

This course considers the contemporary role, structure and procedures of the United States Supreme Court through an examination of selected cases currently pending before the Court. Students investigate the views and outlook of the Court's current justices as to the Court's role generally and with respect to these particular cases. Substantial classroom discussion, an in-class presentation, and a paper reflecting significant independent research will be required. 

Prerequisite:  Constitutional Law I or permission of instructor.

Foreign Relations Law (2 or 3 Credits) (elective, writing credit available)

This course considers the legal constraints on the exercise of U.S. foreign relations through an examination of historical and contemporary events, including especially the developing controversies involved in the 'War on Terrorism.' Topics include constitutional authority and separation of powers; war powers; executive authority in foreign affairs, including executive detentions; treaty-making power; the role of Congress, the states and courts in foreign affairs; and the relationship between international law and constitutional law.  Substantial classroom discussion, an in-class presentation, and a paper reflecting significant independent research will be required. 

Prerequisite:  Constitutional Law I or permission of instructor.

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Constitutional Law II (3 or 4 credits, elective)

This course examines the individual rights provisions of the United States Constitution, with particular emphasis on the due process clauses of the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments and the equal protection clause of the Fourteenth Amendment.  Other rights such as the right to bear arms and the right against uncompensated takings of property may also be addressed.  The course will also provide some discussion of the theory and practice of constitutional interpretation.

Prerequisite:  Constitutional Law I.

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Course Descriptions:

 

Set forth below are course descriptions for the courses I teach most frequently:

International Civil Litigation (3 credits, elective)

This course addresses a variety of procedural issues which arise in litigation of transnational cases in courts of the United States. Topics may include international jurisdiction, forum selection, extraterritorial regulation and choice of law, service of process abroad; taking evidence abroad; foreign sovereign immunity; the act of state doctrine; and recognition and enforcement of foreign judgments.  Prerequisite: None, although a working knowledge of basic civil procedure in U.S. courts will be assumed.

Courses:

 

Constitutional Law I, MW, 10:00 am to 11:50 am

(course webpage here)

 

International Business Transactions, MW, 4:00 pm to 5:15 pm

(course webpage here)

 

Office Hours:

 

1:00 pm to 3:30 pm, Monday and Wednesday

Room 319, Warren Hall